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2018-12-05 07:54 by Karl Denninger
in Editorial , 190 references
[Comments enabled]  

Dear Mr. President:

You threatened to veto the last two omnibus spending bills if wall funding was not included.  You lied; you signed both.  It was that very pair of lies that gave rise to the caravan; in short, thousands did not believe you would keep them from becoming welfare leeches upon our land.

We know that was their intent because they turned down asylum in Mexico -- and jobs.  They did not intend to come to work; Mexico does not offer freebies, but does have plenty of jobs.

Then you said you would keep all of them out of the US.  You didn't.  Some did get in.  You said anyone who came illegally would be criminally charged.  None were; all have been released.  While a judge in the 9th Circus issued an (unconstitutional, as it exceeded jurisdiction) injunction I understand that giving that judge the finger carried high risk.  There was no such risk in criminally charging every single illegal entrant especially those who you could have charged with felonies (e.g. assault with a deadly weapon -- thrown rocks.)

Now we have a new budget showdown.

There's a basic rule you seem to have forgotten: Three strikes and you're out.

Historically there is another "three" issue to think about: Three strikes of the match.

I very much doubt that Americans care enough about freedom to pay attention to the latter any more; we lost that somewhere around the 1950s and it's only gotten worse since.

But we haven't forgotten how many outs you get in baseball yet.

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2018-12-05 07:00 by Karl Denninger
in Editorial , 174 references
[Comments enabled]  

Gee, you don't say....

 

So the penalty for murdering 3,000 ordinary Americans is...... nothing.

The penalty for murdering a bunch of Syrians is..... nothing.

But murder one journalist and..... off with his head!

Mr. Matthews, may I not-so-politely point out that the proper way to look at such hypocrisy would be to turn it around at your particular profession, and since lying is in some contexts punishable by imprisonment (and in others not at all, you see) the maximum penalty should always be applied to journalists who lie?

We can start with you.

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2018-12-04 09:36 by Karl Denninger
in Editorial , 410 references
[Comments enabled]  

No, I will not be setting up operations to license out HomeDaemon-MCP on a "distributor" basis while in Florida.

I will be leaving Florida.

The recent election was too close.  Worse, there are now not one but two initiatives headed for the ballot 2 years hence that will ban the 2nd Amendment in the state.

Now granted, they need a lot of signatures.  But they'll get 'em, since signatures on petitions are really almost-exclusively a function of money.  The actual ballot language will almost-certainly be misleading in some way, as the Grayhound one was -- that provision, which passed, omitted any mention of the fact that it was not limited to dog racing but in fact put an animal rights clause into the Constitution.  That of course can be used to ban hunting and fishing -- and you can bet it will be tried.

One of these petitions would ban all semi-automatic weapons in the state.  Even a lowly Ruger 10/22 would become illegal.  So would any Form-4 weapons.  The test is whether such a weapon can take a larger magazine than 7 rounds.  This would encompass all semi-automatics, since all of them with detachable magazines can accept a larger magazine.

I'm sure there would be an immediate lawsuit should this pass, and perhaps before it is even on the ballot, but does it matter?  If this sort of Marxism is what Florida has become I want no part of it, and I certainly want no part of building a business in the state and employing people which will add to the tax base and common benefit for state residents.

There has to be a price for this sort of horse****, and the best and highest peaceful price I can exact is to leave, taking not only my personal commerce and thus the taxes that generates but also the business taxes I could generate were I to stand up a retail or distribution firm in the state.

So if you want to pick up HomeDaemon-MCP and be the seller, well, as I pointed out recently now's the time since the price is lower now than it will be once I choose a new home and settle there.  I will, assuming someone hasn't bought me out on this first, bring that business and tax revenue to said new state, but I'm going to take my time and choose carefully, since I'm not getting any younger and wherever I go this time around it will likely be where I choose to lay down roots and, ultimately in another 30 or so years, wind up as ashes.

So be it Florida.

PS: Want to buy me out on HomeDaemon and maybe include the Ticker in the deal, the latter of which does have a registered Federal trademark?  Look to the right for contact info...

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2018-12-04 07:00 by Karl Denninger
in Editorial , 156 references
[Comments enabled]  

It's often asked -- how hard would it be, and would it involve extraordinary lawlessness (e.g. murder on a mass scale, civil war, etc) to fix health care?  Really fix it -- such as by demanding and getting passed something that looks like this?

Answer: NOT HARD AT ALL.

France is showing us this.

Their "yellow shirt" protests have exploded in size and popularity.  This, I remind you, is over a carbon tax on gas and diesel.

Something that is much less important than health care.

Oh, don't get me wrong -- a gas tax is a big deal, and Macron is finding out the hard way that "being green" has limits -- with those limits being found in people's wallets and the tolerance they have (or not, as the case may be) for an outright screwing.

But the screwing we take here in America is multiples of that imposed in France on gas and diesel.

The impact of these protests has to been to basically shut down tourism.  It's over.  Done.  Finis.  Kaput.  In the toilet.

Retail sales in the impacted French areas are off 35%.

How long can the economy survive such a hit?  Not very long!

What happens to tax revenues?  They get destroyed.

What happens to the government when faced with such a thing?  It either decides to start mass murdering people if they won't cut it out, which initiates a civil war, or it folds to their demands.

Guess what?  All government exists only as long as the people consent.

Oh, and the latest?  They won.

French Prime Minister is expected to announce a suspension of fuel tax hikes that have provoked a protest movement that has grown violent, according to French media.

I guess the French, ironically known as the folks from whom you can buy a great battle rifle -- never fired, only dropped once -- are proving to have far more willingness to push back against being screwed than Americans, even though their screwing is far less than the one we take in the medical sector on a daily basis.

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2018-12-03 07:00 by Karl Denninger
in Editorial , 156 references
[Comments enabled]  

The news out of the G-20 is that China's Xi has "agreed" to list fentanyl as a controlled substance in China.

Think about this folks -- in China, up until now, it was legal to manufacture and ship fentanyl to places they knew had banned it -- including the United States?

Really?

Am I supposed to cheer this development or should I request a few nukes be dropped on Beijing for their decade long provision of this poison to the United States and should I request a second set for DC since the clown-car brigade in both parties gave and maintained "free trade" status with a nation that has been and is intentionally sticking the middle finger up in the air at all the people were murdering here in America?

70,000 of them last year, may I note.

Quit blowing smoke up my ass.  While I am happy for any progress in getting this scourge out of the United States -- don't get me wrong -- anyone who thinks we've made a big difference in this instance has rocks in their head.  Never mind that I saw nothing about a timeline or enforcement guarantees.

The latter is, of course, critical.

If you don't stop the shipment of this crap then nothing matters.  Stopping the shipment means screening outbound packages, an end to "tariff and inspection-free" shipping systems like the ePacket garbage, and real enforcement on the Chinese end -- none of which is going to happen.

In other words it's a nice "gesture" and -- unfortunately - nothing more.

Just watch -- there should be a near-complete cessation of this crap coming into the US immediately, as nearly all of it comes from China, if this is real.  There won't be, and thus you'll have your answer -- it was all BeeEss.

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