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Jtemp
Posts: 60
Incept: 2008-07-06

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In regards to church donations, I do not know the pedo-status of the Arch Diocese of Detroit, but the traditional parish I belong to is a good one. I donate a one time check at Christmas that only goes toward that church. Another option is donating to the school or scholarships to bypass the diocese or Vatican.
Dennisglover
Posts: 715
Incept: 2012-12-05

Huntsville, AL
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Coming to me from my very enjoyable Brother-in-law:

Bill wrote..
McKinney family history

Few residents of Randolph county were as widely and favorably known as the late Jesse B. McKinney, for many years a wealthy and popular citizen of the township of Green. Joseph McKinney, grandfather of Jesse B. McKinney, served all through the Revolution, was twice taken prisoner, and was once tied to the stake to be burnt, but was rescued by an Indian chief, who paid his ransom and set him free. Mr. McKinneys paternal ancestors were early settlers of Kentucky, his father, Anthony Wayne McKinney, having been born in Newport when that city was but a mere frontier outpost. Anthony Wayne McKinney moved to Ohio in early manhood and there met and married Elizabeth Brackin, of Clarke county, in which part of the state he continued to reside until his removal to Randolph county, Ind, in the year 1837. On coming to Randolph county, Mr. McKinney engaged in farming and milling in Green township, both of which occupations he carried on with good success until his death, August, 1872. By his marriage, noted above, Anthony W. McKinney became the father of eleven children, of whom but four are living at this time; to a second union, solemnized in 1852 with Mrs. Catherine Maricades, seven children were born, five of whom yet survive. Mr. McKinney was a man of excellent character and his energy and thrift were rewarded by a handsome fortune, the greater part of which was accumulated after his removal to the Hoosier state. He entered the American army in 1812 as fifer, and served as such throughout that war, taking part in a number of battles and minor engagements with the British and their Indian allies.
Jesse B. McKinney, whose name introduces this sketch, was born January 8, 1822, in Clarke county, Ohio, and accompanied his parents to Randolph county, Ind., in the year above noted. His educational training embraced the studies usually taught in the common schools of those times, and until attaining his majority he remained under the parental roof, assisting his father in the work of the farm and mill. When he began life upon his own responsibility his future appeared anything but promising, and his children state that his sole earthly possessions at that time consisted of the clothing he wore, a few effects tied up in a cotton handkerchief, and twenty-five cents in money. Thus equipped, he resolutely started out to make his own way in the world, and it is a fact worthy of note that his first job of work was secured after a long and footsore tramp to the town of Peru, where he secured employment as a general laborer at $8 per month. After remaining in Peru for a period of four months he returned home and rented his fathers mill, which he operated with reasonably fair success until he met with an accident, which caused the loss of a finger, when he gave up the milling business and engaged in the general mercantile trade in the town of Fairview, which he carried on with financial profit for a period of nearly six years, when he exchanged his stock of goods for a farm of 160 acres. To this tract he made additions at various times, purchased other lands in different parts of Randolph and other counties and in time became one of the most successful real estate dealers in this part of the county, his lands, some time previous to his death, amounting to nearly 2,000 acres.
Mr. McKinney possessed financial ability of an unusually high order, and his judgment on all matters of business policy was seldom, if ever, at fault. Every enterprise to which he turned his hand appeared to prosper, and the large fortune which he acquired was entirely the result of his own energy and wisely directed business thrift. In many respects he was a model farmer and believed thoroughly in the true dignity of the noble calling of agriculture. He took great interest in raising fine livestock of all kinds, which business returned him handsome profits, as is attested by the large demands in Randolph and other counties for the horses, cattle, hogs, etc., bred by him on his farm in Green township.
Personally, Mr. McKinney enjoyed great popularity in the community where he resided, and he was benevolent and charitable in all those terms imply. Though not visibly connected with any church or religious organization, he believed in the teachings of the Holy Writ and gave unstintedly of his means to the furtherance of all religious, educational and charitable institutions, as well as to all enterprises of a public nature, having for their object the material well being of the county.
Mr. McKinney was united in marriage August 10, 1848, to Elizabeth A. Manor, whose birth occurred March 13, 1830, in Berkeley county, West Va. Mrs. McKinney is the daughter of Caleb and Elizabeth (Suvers) Manor, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Virginia, and bore her husband four children, namely: Mary C., widow of William Starbusk; Emazette, wife of J. W. Reece, a land agent residing at Dunkirk; Elizabeth J., deceased, and Ella Estelle, wife of H. A. Blakely, who resides on the old homestead with the widowed mother. The parents of Mrs. McKinney were most estimable people and reared a family of seven children, all living but two.
Politically Mr. McKinney was a democrat of the Jeffersonian school, and for years was looked upon as a leader in the deliberations of his party in Green township. No man of the township contributed more in a substantial way than he to the growth and development of the country. His farm, which is considered one of the best in Randolph, numbers among its many improvements an elegant residence, erected in 1870 at a cost of $30,000 and an extensive cattle barn, 666X66 feet (built of brick), all under roof and well floored, in which over 800 head of cattle can be sheltered and well cared for. At the time of his death he was the possessor of over 1,700 acres of very valuable land, beside numerous herds of live stock and large sums of money invested in other and safe enterprises. His was indeed a well rounded and successful life, and his death, which occurred on the 14th day of February, 1888 was an event deeply and unusually deplored throughout Randolph and adjoining counties.

Now, what's the point of all of this, other than it's possibly an interesting story? In some strange way, this fellow might just have been an ancestor, or at least linked to me via the family, but this thing looks a lot like an obituary memorial of some sort, a pretty effusive one at that, wherein the desire of the author is to praise this man for a life well-lived. It also seems to be pretty honest and direct.

Hmmm... I wonder if Zuckerberg, Bezos, Gates, Trump, Obama, and so many more will get this kind of "coverage" in their obituary memorials. Maybe it's OT to bring it up here, in this thread, and if it is I apologize, but it kind of got on my mind.

In fact, I wonder if anyone will "eulogize" me in quite this character...

Remains to be seen, for now...

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TANSTAAFL
Nonsensical
Posts: 111
Incept: 2017-06-16

Los Angeles, Ca
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@Rollformer

Well, remember when San Francisco was just a city and not Silicon Valley's personal club.

Surveillance Valley is rolling its army out, join or die:

inline





Here you can join them: http://www.knightscope.com/?gclid=EAIaIQ....

Here's their declaration of war to the SEC: https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/....

Sorry, only three colors available at the moment:


This one couldn't stand making Chinese slave wages so it ended it all (you just pay their masters $7/hr to rent them):



I thought you needed a permit to film in public areas....

But don't worry, there's no surveillance allowed at their fortress, The Battery, their, what, $50 million club. Members only, though.
Erroldo
Posts: 2
Incept: 2013-09-12

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This college cost is extortion. When I came here from Jamaica in the late eighties, I finished Georgia Tech with an MSEE and had a combined 20k in student loan for both BS and MS. Paid it off in 3 years as an engineer. Now my son has a 4.0 with lots of AP classes and it is costing me 21k per year after they gave him 10k in scholarship at Arizona State U, and that's instate tuition. He wanted to go to Stanford but did not get in. Now I am glad he did not. That was 70K per year and he would not get any scholaship. Almost 300k for an engineering degree! This cannot continue. It has to break somewhere. At the same time, the kid next to him might be there free, due to parent income level. Following Carl since the housing fallout and he really opened my eyes. I am coaching him to finish early if possible, AND NO STUDENT LOAN.
Thanks Carl for all the eye openers on finances, health care and staying fr***ing healthy by dumping the carbs!
Goforbroke
Posts: 6996
Incept: 2007-11-30
A True American Patriot!
Drain the Swamp!
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Quote:
That was 70K per year and he would not get any scholaship.
And it's not just the "elite" schools like Stanford, Ivy League ... we looked at Bucknell, Lafayette, Lehigh (all in PA) ... $65,000 a year and no scholarship unless you played sports or had an ACT of 32+ to get merit. You're right ... it's out of control. People are nuts to be paying this. I told my daughter that she had to figure out how to fall under what I was willing to spend without any loan. She did that by applying for a 4-year ROTC scholarship and got it. Full tuition and fees, $400 a month stipend (in return for a 4-year commitment). I am paying roughly $10,000 a year for room and board. If she can't hack it, tough. She's out. And there's the incentive for not screwing off.

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Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our Light, and not our Darkness, that most frightens us. -- Marianne Williamson
Gantww
Posts: 1416
Incept: 2011-04-22

Nashville, TN
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Karl,
Do you know what happens when you cut the people out of your life who advocate for infringing your rightful liberty, taxing you into serfdom, pushing genocidal ideation (hello Democrats), continuing the process of asset-stripping others and the like? Your life gets better. Like, way better. It turns out that most of the victim-oriented crap comes from people who take more than they give and who take more than you realize until they aren't there.

I've cut most of these sort of folks off completely, although there are a few family members for whom I hold out hope (at arms' length). Life is better without them. Every so often I get to interact with these people again and I remember why I don't do it.

Cutting these people off also reduces the friction against getting people in your life who make it better. The sort of folks whose presence makes life better are turned off by the rent-seekers and moochers too. You talk about cutting carbs a lot and thus getting more nutritional food, but these people are the social equivalent of carbs. Not only do they create socially degenerative disease, but they push health out of the picture too.

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Pissing on the host in the middle of the living room with guests present is a pretty good reason for the host to forcibly remove one from the scene, in my humble and correct opinion. - Jack_Crabb
Pjstaff
Posts: 250
Incept: 2008-01-21

Olympic Peninsula
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Quote:
To one up the scam, one of the colleges we visited with our daughter in the last year won't accept an AP credit if it was used a credit to graduate from high school (dual credit)even if they have a 1.


Are you sure they didn't just mean that they won't accept a 1 for credit? My daughter is starting this year and only her AP scores of 4 or 5 are counting towards credit, even though any score will get the HS credit.
Svtikicat
Posts: 14
Incept: 2017-05-24

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I'm sure we all know by now turning this aircraft-carrier-of-a-country around is going to be slow but there are signs of hope. I just back from the dermatologist's office and both the doctor and nurse (overweight) were quizzing me on my LCHFMP diet. I pointed out I am off all of the drugs I was on a couple of years ago, blood pressure is now normal, weight is almost ideal, etc.

The most powerful way of getting the word out is simply leading by example. I am the 3rd person in our ~200-person office that has lost significant weight and people have noticed. Some refuse to do something about their weight, citing the "difficulty" of eating properly on the road, but they do know the solution now should they decide to get healthy.

I see it as a very good sign that doctor's are starting to see their patients get healthy and are asking questions. They, above all others, have the potential of saving many lives by steering patients into the right diet, despite what the HMO's policies are regarding nutrition.

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SAD FACT: Misinformed people rarely change their minds when presented with the truth.
Tsherry
Posts: 864
Incept: 2008-12-09

Spokane WA
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A little prognostication:

1) we are overbuilt in the retail sector by at least 50%, most of which can be found in boat anchors currently called "shopping malls". As the 'anchor stores' in these die, they will be redeveloped into nearly self-contained urban villages, with housing, medical care, adult and child daycare, movie theaters and fitness centers, along with boutique stores catering to a resident population. Small stores that survived by being parasites near anchors will die. We can't do a thing about it, and probably shouldn't.

2) we are overbuilt in the 'higher education sector' by far more than 50%; an infrastructure build that was financed through unsustainable wealth extraction called "student loans." Traditional 'higher education' will transition in the next decade from a campus-based model to an on-line model, eliminating the need for student housing, student 'recreation centers', cafeterias, and the vast majority of non-laboratory type classrooms, lecture halls and offices. The need for FT tenured professors and the current model will collapse. We are already seeing this with online accredited programs that are largely taught by adjunct professors at for profit colleges. Public colleges are starting to smell their own decomposition, and are belatedly getting into the game. I'd further predict that vocational schools will explode in activity...but it'll be first generation immigrants who do the learnin'.

I think both are good signs. We're still completely and utterly ****ed, though.

---

I've got a few more years before the Martin Baker becomes an option, but I am certainly dialing things way back. Learned this morning that a long-time client of mine passed away yesterday at 53 from a heart attack while on vacation. Mildly overweight, not particularly active; had he known of Karl's diet/exercise regimen, he might not have left a widow and a ten year old son behind.

Today's lesson: life's too short to put up with **** like this for very much longer.
Ckaminski
Posts: 4149
Incept: 2011-04-08

Mass-Hole!
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Quote:
we are overbuilt in the retail sector by at least 50%, most of which can be found in boat anchors currently called "shopping malls". As the 'anchor stores' in these die, they will be redeveloped


Indeed. A mall near me:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natick_Mal....

Built condos on the site of an old Wonder Bread factory (WAAAAH I miss the smell of that place). It's attached to the mall, and they've gone VERY upscale. This has the potential to be a model for conversion of these properties. I can envision as Sears dies, they could be replaced by grocery's coming in and providing some turnkey services, including home-delivery, that just aren't scaleable in other places.

Whether it's economically viable, I don't know. The Natick Collection experience was saddled by a lot of new construction - renovation of existing properties could be a lot easier and cheaper.
Bceaglejoe
Posts: 4
Incept: 2017-08-03

Massachusetts
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Svtikicat: If you want to have a really good time with LCHFMP, then go to your dentist's office and explain what you're doing. It might provide a hint as to why the routine cleaning was so much quicker and less traumatic than it was before.

I've been mostly LCHFMP for two years (really got back into it in earnest about five months ago) and I haven't had a cavity since - and I used to be good for one a year.

I've seen others asking questions, and some more people at my office have started to lose weight, but for a lot of people, inertia is too powerful. They "have" to eat out, they "have" to eat carbs and get the PUFA-fried appetizers with their meal, and they can't conceive of living another way.

And, as above, I've avoided church services since the scandal broke (in my own archdiocese, no less) about fifteen years ago. And I sleep just fine at night.
Whitehat
Posts: 95
Incept: 2017-06-27

New York City
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@Jtemp

You are still supporting their system and the people working for it who themselves have no problem with its actions. Additionally unless what you call a parish has as a whole stood up and cut themselves off from the regional and worldwide organization, they are still supporting it socially and financially. As for supporting their **** schools, do they give the students regular lessons in the responsibility to do the right thing regardless of the consequences as both an individual and as a community in spirit. Do they also teach that to be absolved of sin as you call it you must right the wrong and accept the consequences of doing so. Do they teach that one cannot partake of certain sacraments unless one does the right thing, stuff like your communion which the hierarchy participates in regularly. So much for your good parish and its schools, burn the check next time.

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There are two ways to be rich: One is by acquiring much, and the other is by desiring little.
Thorvold
Posts: 192
Incept: 2013-09-12

NY
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Eating right and doing everything possible to stay in good health allows effective shunning of the medical rackets. The following excerpt exposes yet another ripoff.

From the 8/7/2017 NYT:
The New Health Care

Medicare Advantage Spends Less on Care, So Why Is It Costing So Much?
By AUSTIN FRAKT


Concern about Medicare Advantages cost has found sharp expression in a recent suit brought by the Justice Department charging UnitedHealth with excessive billing of the government. While that suit plays out, research published by the National Bureau of Economic Research provides context.

The study, released in January, found that the revenue Medicare Advantage plans received in 2010 exceeded the amount they paid out for medical care by a hefty 30 percent. At more than $2,000 per enrollee per year, that probably topped $20 billion dollars, nearly all from federal payments, not enrollee premiums. The study relied on Medicare Advantage billing data obtained from three large insurers across 36 states, a type of data the government doesnt yet release.
Nonsensical
Posts: 111
Incept: 2017-06-16

Los Angeles, Ca
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I'm part of the x-generation, so back in the mid and late 1990s I was a young guy, but I had some money. And I'd get all of these investment opportunity portfolios, just a flood of them coming out of Silicon Valley. And also participating in venture capitalist funds.

Me, not knowing much about any of this as my interests were elsewhere, I finally had a chance to talk to one of these venture capitalists. And I asked him, what is this really all about? The going seed money, acquisitions, etc just sounded crazy to me. It didn't make any sense.

Of course these really ballooned into the dot-com bubble. The problem is, too many people think it was just irrational behavior...but what if it wasn't?

Here's what I was told, and you can decide for yourself. Once NSFNET was handed over many realized, for good or bad, that it was on: it was going to be a winner takes all battle. Guys like Tom Perkins realized (maybe not at that moment, but soon enough) that this was potentially going to be one of the biggest wealth transfers in history, and others like professors Robert Frank and Philip Cook that this isn't going to be good, expressed in their 1995 book, the winner take all society.

Of course for good or bad this was reinforced by Netscapes IPO. Not only did it make an insane amount on returns, but there was one more important feature: it was going to be about who struck first.

See, Netscape was racing against Microsoft who they didn't feel they could stand up against, so they raced to cash out (not really to compete).

Money was flying around because they realized that a small change could have a huge impact with Internet exposure. So it was all about getting as big as fast as you can, that is, becoming a monopoly.

Sure, there's all sorts of crazy stories like Webvan, but everyone behind the scenes knew that there were going to be a lot of these because that's the nature of a winner take all environment.

When these venture capitalist came in, the prime strategy could basically be summed as: opportunities before efficiencies.

So people can say how inefficient these companies are, etc etc and how unwieldy they are, but then you don't understand how the game is being played. They know this. It's about market control first.

This is why the liberalization of political rights and the liberalization of the economy doesn't go hand in hand. If you want political liberty to be the primary focus, then there has to be an apriori limit to monetization, that is, anti-trust law and enforcement.

The government is good at some things (or it's the best) and it's bad at some things. But to subscribe to blanket universal statements like, it's always good or bad is simply foolish.

To say the government is always good is to risk being under a tyranny.

But to say it's always bad is to willingly divest yourself from the real source of power: that's an army.

I look at many comments and sometimes I don't know where to begin, it's like there's a game being played, but it's not that you don't know how the game is being played but that sometimes it doesn't seem like people are even aware a game is being played.
Nonsensical
Posts: 111
Incept: 2017-06-16

Los Angeles, Ca
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I agree with Karl's shunning, because it will be a combination of things. Shunning, taking back the government, starving the beast, etc. You can even protest these tech leaders when they give individual speeches.

San Francisco is waking up. There is a building war between the progressives and libertarian tech leaders. How that gets settled, who knows
Rufust445
Posts: 739
Incept: 2007-08-11

Emerald City
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Whitehat wrote..
Allan Greenspan used to say that Americans would never challenge the system as they are too financially tenuous to risk their jobs or the system itself. He said that their debt and investment in the system kept them under control.

After the 2008 meltdown, Mr. Greenspan admitted that some of the assumptions he made about the "Goldilocks" economy while chairing the Fed, were wrong.

Having worked in the auto industry for a number of years, I could see the meltdown coming just from the way things were run, and retired when I could no longer stand it. Could have contributed longer, but my time was prioritized by political idiocies coming down from upper management.

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"The stock market isn't bullish, it's bull$hit." -- Alan King
Rufust445
Posts: 739
Incept: 2007-08-11

Emerald City
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Nonsensical wrote..
I look at many comments and sometimes I don't know where to begin, it's like there's a game being played, but it's not that you don't know how the game is being played but that sometimes it doesn't seem like people are even aware a game is being played.

And thus the origin of the term, Sheeple.

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"The stock market isn't bullish, it's bull$hit." -- Alan King
Tsherry
Posts: 864
Incept: 2008-12-09

Spokane WA
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"When these venture capitalist came in, the prime strategy could basically be summed as: opportunities before efficiencies."

One of my brothers, a former venture capitalist who lost his ass in 2000, would rephrase this as "When these venture capitalist came in, the prime strategy could basically be summed as: theft before actual value."
Unknownsailor
Posts: 404
Incept: 2009-04-06

Bremerton, WA
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I think you might have posted this before, Carl:
http://archive.is/jTH0Z
$153,161.25 snakebite bill by a hospital.

I posted a condensed version of your anti-trust rant on the medical industry with it on my FB feed; we'll see what kind of traction I get.
Nonsensical
Posts: 111
Incept: 2017-06-16

Los Angeles, Ca
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@tsherry

Well, you have to be careful when you enter a type of world: just what kind of world are you entering. By 2000, the venture capitalist world was clearly a winner take all world.

It really started back in the late 1970s, early 1980s (signaled by the Democrats turning their backs on their antitrust party platform, and later the 1982 Reagan Administration redefining merger acquisition). Especially the focus shifting from the preservation of completion being the goal of anti-trust law to now scale and efficiency being the goal whereas competition is merely a means to that goal. But the point of antitrust regulation was to prevent regional decay in the US, or essentially a consolidation of power. Under the antitrust laws, up until about 1980, the South, especially places like Mississippi were catching up in economic equality. But that's ended now, and pretty much power is consolidating in a few coastal regions like New York, Washington DC and San Francisco. But this is politics, and it's the tail, the end originated in the public body. Supposedly the Democrats have an antitrust policy that they've begun to roll out last month that they're calling "a better deal". I haven't had much time to really go over it yet...we'll see.

But the point being, though, by 2000, it was a zero sum game, and so the dot com bubble is madness because everyone is rushing for a door that is very small.

I wouldn't say there wasn't value being added, it's just that once you reach a certain proportion of market control that value becomes smaller and smaller, until you reach a position that it becomes a negative value. This happens with all monopolies,and by 2000, some of those were established. Even Bezo's Amazon didn't start off as a monopoly.

None of these companies should have gotten this big, but since Robert Bork, the justice department under Carter to Obama, and likely Trump think the measure of a monopoly is measure solely through consumer price. Bezos isn't dumb, he knows it's the consumer that's the only measure for monopolistic practices, and he wants to create a cult following. This is why sports leagues are so hard to regulate is because they have a rabid fan base to block any attempts.

Of course in the long run, these "low prices" are only good in the short term, the long term because they're low through policy not competition and innovation they're very destructive.

@Rufust

Well, I'd be one of those sheeple, because back in the late 1990s when this was being explained to me, I just couldn't wrap my head around it. So I'll go into more detail. This was the argument and proposal for investing in amazon that I was given, in summary. Hopefully I don't get the details wrong. This really isn't my area of expertise and I'm relaying investment strategies, which isn't my expertise either. So someone correct me if I'm wrong, please.

So basically the Internet is handed over by the government, but with no provisions, and no clear guidelines (there were when it was NSFNET because there was an acceptable use policy). And Tim Berners-Lee wasn't going to patent the Word Wide Web (which the Internet and the WWW are not the same thing). This opens everything up, and as we've had this discussion in a past post by Karl: if it's on the Internet it must be okay and legal.

Then it was pitched that Amazon, in 1996 was seeded with $8 million for something like 12-13%, I can't remember, and the company was only a year old. This just didn't make any sense to me, $8 million dollars was a lot of money then, I mean a lot. In sports, that was like Michael Jordan money. And this just to sell books online.

But here's how it was going to work. Basically it was going to be through tax evasion, not illegal evasion, but questionable. The idea was to push the ruling from a previous Supreme Court case, Quill Corp v North Dakota. The lack of a physical presence in a state is sufficient grounds to exempt a corporation from having to pay sales and use taxes to a state. Until then, I'd never even heard of this case.

But there was more, there was legislation being pushed through, which would later go through sometime in 1998, called the Internet Tax Freedom Act, which said you couldn't enact a tax that specifically targeted an online business. So the idea was to push the Quill Corp ruling to its limits, and while the states battled it out with Amazon, Amazon would have about a 10% price advantage in the big markets where sales taxes tended to be higher.

And if the states tried to make up the gap while the case was ongoing they couldn't thanks to Congress and Bill Clinton because any raise on e-commerce had to also extend to the box retailers.

Then the key was location. Amazon had to be headquartered in a city sufficient for a headquarters and distribution but not a huge population, because they would have to pay sales and use taxes there. Hence, Seattle, Washington fit the bill.

And then there were other tactics involving transfer payments and such in regards to taxes. But this was openly pitched. And there was a lot more to the strategies (like how Amazon could list titles through the wholesaler without actually having the title in stock, etc). But it was set out clearly, methodically, and pretty openly. There was no qualms about it.

At the time I just found it implausible that you were just going to be allowed to sell books without paying taxes. I just didn't think they were going to be able to get away with it. Well, shows what little I knew.

But that's was almost 20 years ago, now it's right in our faces. What, it's estimated 50% of all online retail sales are Amazon's. And with all of these monopolies forming, and globalization policies, I mean, the people in the south and mid west must be some of the dumbest people because they control as a block around 150 electoral votes, and they've gotten it the worst from these policies.

The regional disparities in the US have grown massively worse since 1980, and none of this is due to innovation (actually, over the last 30 years, corporate tech upgrades are down 30%), or competition, it's all been policy driven.

But I've been conned a lot myself in the past by these policies, and companies, and ideas. So what do I know, I am one of the sheeple.

Jtemp
Posts: 60
Incept: 2008-07-06

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Whitehat

Assumptions, assumptions.
Feel free to get up to speed on our parish doctrine at:http://www.ststephennewboston.org./

So you would toss out 2000 years of civilization and the catholic education at our **** school? Are you suggesting to shut down the public schools as well? High aspirations if so, although I might join you on that one.
I'll keep the checks rolling if you don't mind.
Jack_crabb
Posts: 5246
Incept: 2010-06-25

Peoples' Republik of Maryland
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Jtemp, Whitehat is correct. This is exactly the behavior Karl was ranting about. You try to justify it, but you are a sheeple supporting the boy diddling priests.

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Molon Labe
Where is Henry Bowman when you need him?
How many are willing to pledge this? We mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor
Whitehat
Posts: 95
Incept: 2017-06-27

New York City
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@Jtemp

Hi Jtemp, the Catholic system is the problem. Every teacher and other employee of the schools and parish are earning a living by keeping their mouths shut. The crime of what goes on there is systemic and is sanctioned at the top, consequently the entire organization is at fault. When was the last time that the local parish told the bishop that no funds were going up the ladder? Or, if this is not possible due to ownership issues with parish property, did the local officials tell everyone not to donate even one cent to the local org. Did they stop renting out their halls, running BINGO, accepting fees for ministerial services. They could even tell the parents not to pay the tuition at the school and ask everyone who works there to do so for free as part of a moral cause. Everything would function as it did, just no money. I know a little something about how the finances work at these parishes. A parish that is losing money gets its bills paid by the diocese and by extension the larger org. Would you like to see how much news this would get if just one parish did this in protest? It would be a disaster if others followed. If they tied to do the **** where the diocese fires the admin and priests at the parish or transfers them, they could refuse to go. After a while, perhaps a few requests for food for the priests and other employees could be fielded to the faithful. This would be a game of chicken that the larger org would lose big time. Additionally, once everyone is in a position with nothing to lose, they could start exploring options with cannon lawyers to pursue doctrinal cases against the really upper hierarchy and below. For once there would be a public declaration that some sins of omission, publicly committed, bar those of the frock from the sacraments. The Catholic religion has a lot to admire in terms of how demanding the morality is on paper. As an outsider I always respected that this same morality is required in daily secular life, no exceptions. However, your church has allowed this color of moral authority to benefit it and advance its businesses. In practice, the do a lot of nasty **** to people that I have first hand knowledge of and you are at fault and morally wrong since your allegiance to your church is blind. Many laity in your church businesses are absolute dirtbags for two reasons. They rely upon the good Catholics like you to never walk or demand action due to your emotional and social investment. They claim to be a part of a higher club, sometimes even selective. They use this to shield themselves from criticism. They rely upon the naivete of many, perhaps you are here. AND, HERE IS THE BIG ONE, compromised religious such as priests and bishops will allow almost anything to go on in the institutions that they head. In the military they would be seem as security risks due to either their predilections and/or, their participation in a coverup. They can be blackmailed to do and allow anything. The laity know this and I have seen them play situations. This is why the laity involvement that everyone pushes for is not the solution as opportunists with family obligations looking for a job will support the same corrupt system. **** attracts ****.

Mind you my experiences as an outsider where very positive and I steered clear of problematic people. However, let me give you an example. We have a local parish and it is a common joke that the pastor years ago likes little children. It was openly talked about by the school's grammar school age children among themselves. This was in the 1980's for time period. He was very open about his liking for children and it was public all of his little regularly scheduled events. Some jackass even donated the funds and construction of a pre-school in his name after he retired, not even dead, just retired. It was considered fitting since he loved children so much and they only had the standard K-8, bad enough. It was ****ing laughable. Every young person who was there during his tenure got the joke. My friends who attended there were really freaked out about this ****. I asked them if their parents were on psychiatric meds to let this go for so long or what was in those communion wafers. My own mother's best friend asked us if it would be a good idea for her very young child to go to the regular Wednesday even get together with said pastor in his rectory apartment. You ****ing read that right. She had some bad feeling to which we responded that if you feel something is wrong, it probably is. This is a parish in an upper-middle class suburb of New York City with a huge congregation requiring 5 or more services Sunday morning and Saturday and Sunday night. Lots of ****ing money.

Their K-8 school illustrates how systematic evil leads to corruption up and down the ladder. It was an abuse mill like no other. Not the usual story of the abusive nun or discipline that is offered up as cliche. We are talking bad ****, school wide lunchtime punishments of silent lunch day after day, no recess, who school kept late for punishment to the point that the bus company had to seek legal advice for its costs. This would go on for seasons. Daily punishment homework for entire classes. Children berated. Playgrounds covered in dog ****, never cleaned. Angry nasty admin and teachers who freely stated that education did not matter. Shell shocked students who were unprepared for high school and socially damaged. The admin would threaten to add behavioral issues to students' permanent records; you know that ****. Parents did not know what to believe. The teachers and admin would openly bluff that it was free across the street; a public school was there. No parent ever called the bluff as they were convinced that the discipline was better in the Catholic system. Actually since it was a good neighborhood, the public school was fine. I personally think that this was a psychological defense mechanism by the parents. There was also a lot of disciplinarian **** in the media at the time whereby parents with their priorities in disorder could feel that the children were the problem. Back to the **** school. The faculty and admin hated their jobs and were consumed by bitterness and they openly stated that the pastors indiscretions meant that he would never challenge them. They also had none of the certifications to teach at the public schools and no other school would have them. It took two decades to get the **** out of the school and convert it to something sane. Graduates of the school used to come by all of the time for vandalism or to disrupt the attempt at class regularly. Many of the students also had "history" with the pastor. Once someone is compromised, you seldom get truth or testimony. No one will ever say anything as an adult if they have any sort of life for obvious reasons and with the high number of municipal workers where in the community, it would have damaged job prospects or caused issues if they were already on the job.

If you saw the majority of the graduating classes of those roughly my peers from this place, you would see broken people, addiction, broken families, you name it. They cannot even look people in the eye. Eight years of hell and some, girls included took it up the ass.

Since I know it is on your mind and others, I attended a Catholic academy that accepted non-Catholics. All nuns, very ordered, the most godly, excellent, moral, fun, effective people that I ever met. Yes, you can have a well disciplined environment that is not abuse, actually kind of wonderful and to this day a fond memory. You know how these wonderful, dedicated people responded to the church scandals. Closed the place, liquidate and left the order. These were monastic nuns who had no outside lives other than family and spanned many ages. At least they had established their own funds for their elder care. They were disgusted. Now I am privy to their personal reasoning which most are not. What is your excuse given that you have more options than them?

Lest you think that this is only one place, here is another. major Catholic university had a president priest that had his own little society. You are going to love this. It was called the president's society and was an invitation only thing where some of the student deans would recommend students who they felt had the poise, attitude, future prospects and major financial need. On its surface it could be seen as a form of aid to worthy needy students. There were say 8 men and 8 women. There was an interview process and all sorts of hoops. If accepted, their job on a rotating schedule was to be his personal entourage everywhere he went on university functions and business and many other things too, including travel. They received full tuition, a standard wardrobe, stipend, housing, you get the idea. He also had a house where he lived with others, use your imagination. These students were the untouchables and he opened all sorts of doors for them in life. The administration openly knew what he was up to and basically he allowed all sorts of things to run wild during his long tenure there. If someone was sycophantic to him, they could do and did anything. There was a major scandal that made it to the print media, New York Magazine included, where some major institute founded when he was there was a conduit for a person to embezzle millions from the university. She was a personal friend of his and gifted him much. You could see throughout the institution the same angry bitterness as people accepted their fate and the opportunists flooded in. They had a major campus fail totally after a fraud-fueled real-estate deal and lack of anticipation of a market change shifted money, but did not yield results. Major departments lost their Ph.D programs and there were many lawsuits with huge settlements as people figured that the place was a good ATM. All this because someone was compromised and could not be expected to lead morally. The place is a shell of its former glory.

Systematic evil in morality based institutions is destructive and the damage is personal to people. How many times have the above stories been repeated or to a worse degree, Ireland anyone?, because no one has the guts to walk away?

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There are two ways to be rich: One is by acquiring much, and the other is by desiring little.
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